Precious Blood Roman Catholic Church - Info Sheet Print Close
From the Pastor's Desk
Dear parishioners,

I hope and pray that you are staying healthy – both physically and spiritually. Please let me know if the parish can help you during these difficult times.

No doubt you are aware that our parish relies on the support of our parishioners to operate – parish salaries, programs and ongoing operating costs (heating, water, electricity, etc.) – are funded through the generosity of our parish community. It will be a challenge for our parish to maintain operations without the weekly offertory collection.

In response to many requests that I have received from parishioners, here are the ways that you can continue to support our parish at this time:

- Drop off or mail your regular weekly offertory contribution to the parish office.

- Contribute to our parish offertory by credit card. Please click here. You will then be able to select our parish in the drop-down menu. You can make a one time or recurring contribution to our parish offertory or other special funds.

- Contribute through pre-authorized giving. Click here for more information on pre-authorized giving. You can obtain a form from the parish office or you can click here to download an enrollment form which can be printed and completed. Return the completed form and a voided cheque to your parish office. Or e-mail the form and a scanned copy or photo of a voided cheque to development@archtoronto.org for processing. Contributions are withdrawn from your bank account on the 20th of each month.

- You can contribute to the offertory via online banking. To do this, the archdiocese will need to send you a unique account number. Please send an e-mail to campaign@archtoronto.org. In the body of the email provide:

   * Your name
   * Address
   * Parish name
   * Municipality

You will be emailed account information which you can use to set up the Archdiocese of Toronto as a payee in your on-line banking. Your gift will be forwarded to our parish. You can make a one time or recurring gift to our offertory.

If you have any questions please contact the Development Office at the Archdiocese of Toronto, 416-934-3400, ext. 540 or development@archtoronto.org.

Thank you for your many contributions to our parish community. I miss seeing all of you at the Mass and I pray daily that we will be able to gather together again soon.

Yours in Christ,
Fr. Xavier de Pinto

Sunday Masses
Saturday5:00 PM
Sunday8:30 AM
10:00 AM
12:00 PM
Daily Mass
Monday8:00 AM
Tuesday8:00 AM
Wednesday7:00 PM
Thursday8:00 AM
Friday8:00 AM
Saturday8:00 AM
Staff
Pastor:Rev. Xavier De Pinto
In Residence:Abp. Lawrence Saldanha
In Residence:Rev. Joseph Moncada
Contact
Church Address:
1737 Lawrence Avenue East
Toronto, Ontario M1R 2X7
(Just East of Victoria Park Avenue on Lawrence Avenue)

Telephone: 416-751-2661
Fax: 416-751-2662
Email: office@preciousblood.ca
www.PreciousBlood.ca

 
Wheel Chair Accessible

Office Hours
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 9:30am-12:00pm
Wednesday: Closed
Thursday: Closed
Friday: Closed
Saturday: 2:00pm - 6:00pm
Sunday: 8:30am - 1:00pm
Sacrament of Reconciliation/Confession
Saturday: 4:00 – 4:45 PM
Please call the Pastor for other times
Sacrament of Baptism
Please contact the office
Sacrament of Matrimony
Please contact the Pastor at least one year in advance and prior to booking your hall.
Rite of Christian Initiation of Adults (RCIA)
Please contact the office
Knights of Columbus
GK Arturo De Leon - 437-984-1344
tigerdeleon@gmail.com
St. Vincent de Paul Society
Please call 647-499-5594
Schools
Preciuos Blood: 1035 Pharmacy Ave. 416-393-5258
St. Kevin: 15 Murray Glen Dr. 416-393-5300
St. Catherine: 30 Roanoke Rd. 416-393-5316


 
Thinking about the priesthood or religious life? Hearing Jesus' call "Come and follow me"? Not sure?

Visit Vocations Toronto at www.vocationstoronto.ca, a resourceful site in answering these questions.

Sacraments for the Sick & Elderly
Please notify the office if you know of someone who is in hospital or confined to the home due to sickness or old age. We will gladly bring Communion to them.
Other Ministries
For all other ministries:

  • Altar Servers
  • Children's Liturgy
  • CWL
  • Eucharistic Fraternity
  • Financial Council
  • Holy Communion
  • Lectors
  • Legion of Mary
  • Liturgical Decorators
  • Music Ministries - Adults
  • Music Ministries

    please check out our Telephone Directory.

  • Precious Blood Roman Catholic Church
    Scarborough, Ontario
    Saturday, November 28, 2020 - 34th week in Ordinary Time
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    Reflections

    for Sunday, September 20, 2020

    Human Resources would not have been happy with that landowner. Sometimes, it seems that Human Resources does not want to come out on the side of generosity. I remember a time that we wanted to pay an employee extra for work on a particular project. We were told that we could not do this unless we re-adjusted that employee's pay scale for all his work.

    Back in the times of the Lord, HR did not exist. However, people had a sense of what was just and what was unjust. Day workers were given the daily wage of one denarius. The workday was sunrise to sunset. So, it would seem just that those who worked less than a full day should receive less. But in today's parable, sometimes called the parable of the Laborers in the Marketplace, other times, perhaps much better, referred to as the Parable of the Good Employer, the landowner has pity on those who could not find work throughout the day. They had families they had to feed. It was not their fault that no one hired them. Therefore, he hires them, some of them even a few hours before sunset, and gives them all the same daily wage. He is not being unjust to those hired in the early morning. He is being charitable, merciful, to those hired at the end of the day.

    Justice and mercy are compatible when charity is involved. "Are you envious because I am generous," the owner says to those hired at sunrise who protested that they did not receive more. The exact translation of this is "Do you view my actions with an evil, jealous eye?" This occurs in the Gospel of Matthew where we also read, "If your eye causes you to sin, then pluck it out." Usually we relegate this phrase to a sexual connotation. Properly applied to the point of today's parable, the Lord is saying, "If you begrudge generosity to the less fortunate, than you cannot be a Christian." If we do not rejoice in the benefits given to others, than we cut ourselves off from the benefits we have received. As Christians, we are obligated to care for the poor. We need to establish governmental and private means to aid those who cannot help themselves. Yes, these agencies must be regulated to eliminate those who abuse them. That is justice. But our main concern must be to care for those who have less. That is mercy. Some people reduce those forced into situations where they have to seek help from others. This is not how a Christian should act. Yes, we should be happy when we realize that poor, sick, or people hurting in any way are being helped, but more than that, much more than that, we should be extending the hand of God to lift others up.

    "Are you envious because I am generous?" Envy and jealousy are horrible. The jealous person looks for ways to destroy another person's life. The jealous person usually ends up destroying his own life. Or her own life. The jealous person does not appreciate his own gifts. He can only see the gifts that others have. He hates them for their gifts. And his hatred destroys him. Everybody is different. No two people are the same. We do not have the right to compare or contrast others to ourselves.

    This parable should also be applied to our view of our relationship to God. God loves the person who is faithful throughout the day. He loves cradle Catholics who practice their faith throughout their lives. He also loves those who come to him during the day and even in the evening. Many people respond to God's mercy at the end of their lives. God loves them for taking a huge step away from their former lives and for falling into the arms of His Mercy. Literature presents Don Juan who refuse to reject his immoral lifestyle and would rather suffer hell than entrust himself to God. It is a tremendous step of humility to turn from a sinful life and turn to the Lord. God loves those who take this step, even though they join St. Augustine in mourning, "Late have I loved you, O Beauty ever ancient ever new. Late have I loved you." What matters is that they are with him now. God loves cradle Catholics, and he loves converts. He loves those who practice their faith throughout their lives, and he loves those who return to the faith. We rejoice in those who join the faith or return to the faith. We don't consider ourselves superior to them because we are not superior to them.

    At the end of the gospel reading we come upon the phrase, "The first shall be last and the last shall be first." We cannot impose our ways on the Lord. "For my thoughts are not your thoughts, nor are your ways my ways, says the Lord." That is from our first reading. We cannot tell God how to be God. We have to do our best to respond to the call to labor in God's vineyard as we have received it. That call demands that we are open to God's mercy in our lives and that we become vehicles for God's mercy in the lives of others. That is Christianity. To act otherwise is to begrudge God for his generosity, or to be scripturally literal, to look upon God's goodness with an evil, jealous eye.

    The parable of the Laborers in the Vineyard calls upon us to ask God to help us be vehicles of His Mercy.

     
    Readings of the day:
    First Reading:
    Second Reading:
    Gospel:

    This material is used with permission of its author, Rev. Msgr. Joseph A. Pellegrino, Diocese of St. Petersburg, FL. Visit his website

       

    Reflections are available for the following Sundays:

    2020
    2019
    2018
    2017
    2016

    Precious Blood Parish, Toronto